Kate McKee Simmons
Helping mom set up for her sermon on Sunday. PHCC’s windows are pretty in the afternoon light

Helping mom set up for her sermon on Sunday. PHCC’s windows are pretty in the afternoon light

Professors Remember campus 11 years after attack
Eleven years ago, CSU political science professors were forced to adjust their curriculum and teach students about an event that they themselves were still struggling to cope with.
Before the debris from the twin towers had settled, CSU students, faculty and administration gathered on the plaza in front of the Lory Student Center to mourn together.
“The buildings were still falling down and smoldering when they met on the plaza,” retired political science professor Robert Lawrence said.
“The immediate impact on campus was shock and confusion,” political science professor Scott Moore said in an email to the Collegian. “I think we all felt dumbfounded and helpless.”
In the days following the attack, political science professors worked to explain to their students what happened, how it happened and why it happened.
“Students had a hard time wrapping their heads around the whole event or chain of events,” Moore said. “Students and faculty had a difficult problem absorbing and learning ‘why?’ ”
“I spent time in class talking about the attack and giving students an opportunity to comment, express concerns and ask questions,” political science professor Sandra Davis said. “Confronting the attack was one way to start ‘coming to grips’ with the event.”
Lawrence saw exponential growth in attendance at the lecture following the attacks. Even un-registered students came to listen.
“People were standing along the walls. The classroom wasn’t large, but it was standing room only,” Lawrence said. “That particular semester, politics and history seemed more relevant to students.”
In the days and months following 9/11, Lawrence and other political science faculty adjusted their curriculum in an attempt to help students understand why this event happened, and to discuss what the United States’ reaction should be.
“The day after 9/11, I said a few things in class about the imperative for us to try to learn what this represented, particularly how this attack came about,” Moore said. “After a few weeks, it came out how comparatively easy it was for the several hijackers to slip through security at Boston’s Logan Airport to board United Airlines planes.
“When it became known, I think the bravery of the passengers on Flight 93 was definitely noticed and recorded in many of the students’ minds.”
According to Lawrence, new information was coming out everyday about who was involved in the attack, how it happened and how the United States government planned to act.
“After 9/11 it kind of dawned on a lot of people that the United States was vulnerable, and these things could happen on our shores and if it were a nuclear weapon, it would be really serious,” Lawrence said.
Since the attacks, Moore has continued to use his classes to help students understand the impact of 9/11.
“I have spent more time in my classes dealing with ‘decision-making’ and the frailties of human rationality,” Moore said. “I have also spent more time on ‘accountability’ in my State and Local Government and Public Administration courses.”

Professors Remember campus 11 years after attack

Eleven years ago, CSU political science professors were forced to adjust their curriculum and teach students about an event that they themselves were still struggling to cope with.

Before the debris from the twin towers had settled, CSU students, faculty and administration gathered on the plaza in front of the Lory Student Center to mourn together.

“The buildings were still falling down and smoldering when they met on the plaza,” retired political science professor Robert Lawrence said.

“The immediate impact on campus was shock and confusion,” political science professor Scott Moore said in an email to the Collegian. “I think we all felt dumbfounded and helpless.”

In the days following the attack, political science professors worked to explain to their students what happened, how it happened and why it happened.

“Students had a hard time wrapping their heads around the whole event or chain of events,” Moore said. “Students and faculty had a difficult problem absorbing and learning ‘why?’ ”

“I spent time in class talking about the attack and giving students an opportunity to comment, express concerns and ask questions,” political science professor Sandra Davis said. “Confronting the attack was one way to start ‘coming to grips’ with the event.”

Lawrence saw exponential growth in attendance at the lecture following the attacks. Even un-registered students came to listen.

“People were standing along the walls. The classroom wasn’t large, but it was standing room only,” Lawrence said. “That particular semester, politics and history seemed more relevant to students.”

In the days and months following 9/11, Lawrence and other political science faculty adjusted their curriculum in an attempt to help students understand why this event happened, and to discuss what the United States’ reaction should be.

“The day after 9/11, I said a few things in class about the imperative for us to try to learn what this represented, particularly how this attack came about,” Moore said. “After a few weeks, it came out how comparatively easy it was for the several hijackers to slip through security at Boston’s Logan Airport to board United Airlines planes.

“When it became known, I think the bravery of the passengers on Flight 93 was definitely noticed and recorded in many of the students’ minds.”

According to Lawrence, new information was coming out everyday about who was involved in the attack, how it happened and how the United States government planned to act.

“After 9/11 it kind of dawned on a lot of people that the United States was vulnerable, and these things could happen on our shores and if it were a nuclear weapon, it would be really serious,” Lawrence said.

Since the attacks, Moore has continued to use his classes to help students understand the impact of 9/11.

“I have spent more time in my classes dealing with ‘decision-making’ and the frailties of human rationality,” Moore said. “I have also spent more time on ‘accountability’ in my State and Local Government and Public Administration courses.”

CSU graduate Janay DeLoach came back to Fort Collins with a bronze medal from the London Olympic Games.
In Old Town Square Sept. 6 DeLoach was honored for her accomplishments with a rally organized by Old Town Square owner Brian Soukup and DeLoach’s uncle-in-law.
At the event, DeLoach shared her experiences at the Olympics. There was also a long-jump set up so kids could test their abilities in DeLoach’s event.
DeLoach is currently ranked second in the world for long jump and her 22’7” jump this summer at the Olympic games.
She ranked fourth and her final jump got her a spot on the podium.
“Fourth is not the place you want to be at the Olympic games,” said Tim Cawley, DeLoach’s coach and an assistant track coach at CSU.
As fortunate and excited she felt to be participating in the games, DeLoach said it meant more to have her family there than it did to win.
“It’s one thing to say you went to the Olympics, but to share it with people you love is almost more important because you’re not alone,” DeLoach said. “You’re not alone in that moment of glory and you can make eye contact with that person. You can see how excited they are and you just feed off of each other.
“We’re here. We’re actually doing this together and I’m not by myself,” DeLoach said. “It’s fun to share the moment.”
“It was so special because she worked so hard,” said her mother, Dede Deloach. “When she got up there we knew then that she had accomplished what she set out to do. It all paid off.”
Janay DeLoach said she was always athletic but started seriously training for long jump at CSU. She credited the university and Cawley for getting her to the Olympics.
“CSU has been monumental in my development,” Janay DeLoach said. “They started me from scratch. I was doing long jump but I didn’t have any coaching… I didn’t have any form. I wasn’t taught the proper mechanics, how to land in the pit, how to jump off the board, I wasn’t taught any of those things.
“It took me from 2004 when I was a freshmen, now in 2012 to even get close to perfection and I’m not even close (to perfection) even now.”
DeLoach will continue her training so she can return to the 2020 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro and win gold.
“I was disappointed because I trained for gold,” DeLoach said. “I will not give up until I have gold around my neck.
“The support they (CSU) has given me even post-collegiate, the support they give me now is even more monumental than what they did when I was going to college here because it’s harder,” DeLoach said. “It’s so much harder to make it when you’re alone and don’t have anyone to train with.”
While DeLoach has been fortunate to make her athletic aspirations into a career, she is aware of how lucky she is and feels fortunate having the education she received at CSU.
“School is first because not a lot of people, especially athletes make it. It’s really hard to be a professional athlete,” DeLoach said. “What do you have to fall back on? You don’t want to fall back on bad grades. You want to fall back on knowing that you got the education that is going to make you money in the end. School always came first for me. Always.”

CSU graduate Janay DeLoach came back to Fort Collins with a bronze medal from the London Olympic Games.

In Old Town Square Sept. 6 DeLoach was honored for her accomplishments with a rally organized by Old Town Square owner Brian Soukup and DeLoach’s uncle-in-law.

At the event, DeLoach shared her experiences at the Olympics. There was also a long-jump set up so kids could test their abilities in DeLoach’s event.

DeLoach is currently ranked second in the world for long jump and her 22’7” jump this summer at the Olympic games.

She ranked fourth and her final jump got her a spot on the podium.

“Fourth is not the place you want to be at the Olympic games,” said Tim Cawley, DeLoach’s coach and an assistant track coach at CSU.

As fortunate and excited she felt to be participating in the games, DeLoach said it meant more to have her family there than it did to win.

“It’s one thing to say you went to the Olympics, but to share it with people you love is almost more important because you’re not alone,” DeLoach said. “You’re not alone in that moment of glory and you can make eye contact with that person. You can see how excited they are and you just feed off of each other.

“We’re here. We’re actually doing this together and I’m not by myself,” DeLoach said. “It’s fun to share the moment.”

“It was so special because she worked so hard,” said her mother, Dede Deloach. “When she got up there we knew then that she had accomplished what she set out to do. It all paid off.”

Janay DeLoach said she was always athletic but started seriously training for long jump at CSU. She credited the university and Cawley for getting her to the Olympics.

“CSU has been monumental in my development,” Janay DeLoach said. “They started me from scratch. I was doing long jump but I didn’t have any coaching… I didn’t have any form. I wasn’t taught the proper mechanics, how to land in the pit, how to jump off the board, I wasn’t taught any of those things.

“It took me from 2004 when I was a freshmen, now in 2012 to even get close to perfection and I’m not even close (to perfection) even now.”

DeLoach will continue her training so she can return to the 2020 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro and win gold.

“I was disappointed because I trained for gold,” DeLoach said. “I will not give up until I have gold around my neck.

“The support they (CSU) has given me even post-collegiate, the support they give me now is even more monumental than what they did when I was going to college here because it’s harder,” DeLoach said. “It’s so much harder to make it when you’re alone and don’t have anyone to train with.”

While DeLoach has been fortunate to make her athletic aspirations into a career, she is aware of how lucky she is and feels fortunate having the education she received at CSU.

“School is first because not a lot of people, especially athletes make it. It’s really hard to be a professional athlete,” DeLoach said. “What do you have to fall back on? You don’t want to fall back on bad grades. You want to fall back on knowing that you got the education that is going to make you money in the end. School always came first for me. Always.”

UPDATE: motorcycle and car collide near Colorado State, police confirm

Emergency vehicles huddled around the scene of a two-vehicle collision on W. Elisabeth Street and Shields Street (on the west side of Moby Arena and Westfall Hall) responding to a 7:46 a.m. emergency call on Thursday, said Fort Collins Police Services.

“A minor fender bender,” said a police officer at the scene. “Nothing exciting.”

No one was hurt, but a motorcycle damaged the left side panel, bumper and rear light of another car, according to its owner Rose Crouch. The trunk was dented and the car will have to be repainted, she continued. Crouch estimates several thousand dollars in damages were made to her car. She plans to file an insurance claim to pay for damages.

Crouch was on her way to work driving north on Shields Street in slow traffic with her husband, John, when a motorcycle going about 20 mph rear-ended their car.

“I hate driving on Shields and Elisabeth,” said Brad Jakobitz, the motorcycle’s driver and a senior computer science major.

“It’s crowded,” Crouch said.

Spokeswoman Rita Davis said officers were currently at the scene investigating the crash as of 9:20 a.m. Such investigations are standard routine behavior, she said.

Colorado State students and alumni receive resume help

Alex Schnaderbeck, a recent biomedical science graduate, found his college job at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal as a sophomore at the Career Fair.And two years ago, he had the opportunity to represent the Arsenal at the Career Fair.

“I came full circle,” he said.

Schnaderbeck isn’t the only CSU student who has found employment through the Career Fair, sponsored by the university’s Career Center. Countless CSU students have found employment at the 35 different employers involved.

To prepare for the job search, the Career Center is hosting Resume Rush –– a bi-annual event where students can take advantage of having their resumes reviewed and critiqued by a resume specialist.

Resume Rush: September 4, 7 and 10 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m

Career Fair: September 11, 12 and 13 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Tuesday, Sept. 11, will have employers from disciplines focused on health and wellness, social services, education and criminal justice. Wednesday Sept. 12 will have employers from management, finance, agricultural business, liberal arts and marketing. Thursday Sept. 13 will focus on science, technology, agriculture and environment.

There are Career Fairs later in September specifically designated for students majoring in construction management and engineering. Construction management will be Sept. 25 and engineering will be on the 27th.

Students can meet with career counselors and employers for 10 to 15 minutes to revise their resume. Resume Rush will last from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Career Center, which is in the basement of the Lory Student Center.

Last year, 423 students and alumni participated in the Fall Resume Rush.

“We help students to present themselves in the best way possible by giving them tools for a targeted job search process and for increased future success,” Career Counseling Graduate Assistant Elissa Buxbaum said in an email to the Collegian.

“Going to Resume Rush was an awesome way to fit a necessary resume critique into my busy schedule,” junior business and graphic design major Jessica Lederhos said in an email to the Collegian. “I got really helpful advice on how to polish my resume for the upcoming Career Fair in a way that would make it stand out to employers.”

“Students participating will get great advice on how to create a resume that will stand out for all the right reasons,” Buxbaum said.

Schnaderbeck agreed that the tools at Resume Rush are helpful and said he didn’t utilize as much as he should have as a student.

“The resume builder on (the Career Center’s) website is super helpful but I wish I had gone in for more help while I was a student,” Schnaderbeck said. “Now that I’m revisiting my resume (as a graduate) I wish I had gotten more help from them when I was here.”

Employers from different professions will be available at the fair and are grouped by the day. Tuesday, Sept. 11, will have employers from disciplines focused on health and wellness, social services, education and criminal justice. Wednesday Sept. 12 will have employers from management, finance, agricultural business, liberal arts and marketing. Thursday Sept. 13 will focus on science, technology, agriculture and environment.

There are Career Fairs later in September specifically designated for students majoring in construction management and engineering. Construction management will be Sept. 25 and engineering will be on the 27th.

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CSU System Chancellor Michael Martin might have worked in a mine.
The newly-appointed face of the three-campus CSU system spent his young years in the small, rural town Crosby, Minn. where many of his peers did not pursue higher education.
But Martin, with the support of his parents, decided to go to a four-year college, becoming the only one of his siblings to do so.
“My family was very encouraging, not because they knew about it personally, but they understood that I could stay back in Crosby, Minn. and probably join many of my peers in working in the mines, but that was not a future that my parents thought was in my best interest or theirs,” Martin said.
Martin, the former chancellor at Louisiana State University, took over as CSU’s chancellor over the summer. Martin has spent the last few months getting acquainted with Colorado and is excited about being a part of the university.
“Mike understands the big issues and he’s very ready to dig into those and get to work and get the job done,” said CSU President Tony Frank. “There is never any hesitancy on his part to role up his sleeves and get to work.”
According to Frank, Martin’s job is to handle interactions with the Board of Governors — the 15-member council that oversees the CSU System — the state legislature, the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and to represent CSU at a variety of events in Denver.
“Having someone focused on all of those areas is really important,” Frank said. “I think Mike will be a leading voice within Colorado about the importance of sustaining public higher education.”
Martin said he is aware of his responsibilities and goes to work every day ready to remind decision-makers to remember our student body when they are making decisions that will affect CSU students.
“I won’t be able to directly influence students anymore because I’m here in Denver … but I hope I can influence the people who do,” he said. “I hope in that process I can make them continually better servants of the notion that it’s always about the students.”
In his time as a university president or chancellor, Martin has developed two rules he takes with him to work every day.
“No. 1: it’s always about what’s best for the students. No. 2: everyone on campus is important. From professors to the people who mow the lawn, they all serve the students so they’re all important,” Martin said.
“It’s very easy in these jobs to get caught up too often in your own ego because people call you ‘chancellor’ and think that’s important,” Martin said. “That’s only important if you can use whatever that is to advance the best interest of the students. It’s never about me.”
Chancellor Martin said he hopes to make each of the CSU System’s three campuses — in Fort Collins, Pueblo and online — more successful by connecting them and utilizing their individual resources.
“One of the things I think a chancellor can do is be the person who helps think through those cross-campus relationships and remove the barriers that would prevent that from occurring,” he said. “Part of that, it seems to me, is to be the cheerleader and the innovator for relationships which cause the three campuses to be more mutually supportive of one another.”
But Martin isn’t a complete newcomer to CSU. A decade ago, he was considered for the vacant president position at the university. As one of two finalists, Martin chose not to continue on in the process.
“At that time, I still hadn’t concluded that I was ready to lead a major university,”Martin said. “My ego wanted me to do it but my rational thought process said maybe a couple more years… I didn’t see myself ready to take it on. Ten years later and a couple jobs in between later, I think I am.”
Larry Penley, the other finalist, took the job instead and resigned years later amidst a chorus of critique over his job performance.
At his previous job as chancellor of Louisiana State University, Martin faced budget reductions and had to figure out how to keep a campus prosperous despite those reductions. CSU has experienced similar budget cuts and a tuition hike in response to Colorado’s state government budget cuts.
From what Martin has observed, lawmakers are supportive of higher education and his job is to work with them as the face of CSU.
“In general, the populace and the state leadership (in Colorado) deeply regret having to make those cuts and as a consequence there is a fundamental, intrinsic value they have placed for higher education and CSU in particular,” Martin said.
“I’m not sure if that was the case in Louisiana. Many people love LSU deeply but the broader population and the state leadership, I don’t believe had quite the same commitment to higher education as Colorado does.”
Martin explained that with Colorado being in the top five states whose population has bachelor’s degrees, most of the state’s citizens believe in and have witnessed the value of higher education.
“Even during budget cut times it’s nice to know that the citizenry and representatives and the leaders of the state still value what universities do and that gives you a chance to feel as though, when the economy turns, enthusiasm for investing in higher education will endure,” Martin said.
“I think as this economy turns around, even if we don’t see a huge uptake in funding, I don’t think you’ll see continued reductions,” he said. “My sense is that there’s a stronger conviction to fix it here than there is other places and I hope that that shows.”
Martin said he would not have graduated college without state subsidies.“During my growing up years, the state of Minnesota subsidized my education at a very high level,” Martin said. “My home state of Minnesota has always been a very strong supporter of higher education. I would not be here were it not.”
His father graduated high school and worked as a diesel mechanic in mines. His mother didn’t graduate from high school but became the mayor of their small rural town.
“It was clear to them (his parents, that) education was the only way in which the next generation was going to advance over where they started,” Martin said.
Martin is the only one of his siblings who attended a four-year college. One of his brothers is a mailman in rural Minnesota and the other manages five little radio stations.
Both of Martin’s children have gone on to pursue higher education. His daughter, Amanda, attended the University of Wisconsin and his son, Sam, went to the University of Minnesota and went on to get a second degree at Sarah Lawrence College. Currently, Sam is completing his second Master’s degree.
“I don’t think you have to have been a parent to be a university leader or a great university citizen, but in my case it helped a great deal,” Martin said.
“I literally was the dad who moved my daughter into the residence hall and didn’t want to be seen crying in the hallway,” Martin said. “…. I had to disguise my angst of my daughter leaving home.”
Martin’s son attended the University of Minnesota while he was there as dean of the institution and, as Martin admits, might have used his father’s status to his advantage.
“He, on more than one occasion, I discovered, had taken my all-access parking pass out of my car and was using it himself, so I had to threaten to have university police arrest him despite the fact that he was my son,” Martin said.
Coming to Colorado to join the CSU team is a transition, but Martin said he is ready to do all he can to continue the advancing CSU’s progress.
“I’ve always felt that Colorado State and the Colorado State system has been ahead of the national curve in several important areas and I think it can continue to do that,” Martin said.
Senior Reporter Kate Simmons can be reached at news@collegian.com.

CSU System Chancellor Michael Martin might have worked in a mine.

The newly-appointed face of the three-campus CSU system spent his young years in the small, rural town Crosby, Minn. where many of his peers did not pursue higher education.

But Martin, with the support of his parents, decided to go to a four-year college, becoming the only one of his siblings to do so.

“My family was very encouraging, not because they knew about it personally, but they understood that I could stay back in Crosby, Minn. and probably join many of my peers in working in the mines, but that was not a future that my parents thought was in my best interest or theirs,” Martin said.

Martin, the former chancellor at Louisiana State University, took over as CSU’s chancellor over the summer. Martin has spent the last few months getting acquainted with Colorado and is excited about being a part of the university.

“Mike understands the big issues and he’s very ready to dig into those and get to work and get the job done,” said CSU President Tony Frank. “There is never any hesitancy on his part to role up his sleeves and get to work.”

According to Frank, Martin’s job is to handle interactions with the Board of Governors — the 15-member council that oversees the CSU System — the state legislature, the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and to represent CSU at a variety of events in Denver.

“Having someone focused on all of those areas is really important,” Frank said. “I think Mike will be a leading voice within Colorado about the importance of sustaining public higher education.”

Martin said he is aware of his responsibilities and goes to work every day ready to remind decision-makers to remember our student body when they are making decisions that will affect CSU students.

“I won’t be able to directly influence students anymore because I’m here in Denver … but I hope I can influence the people who do,” he said. “I hope in that process I can make them continually better servants of the notion that it’s always about the students.”

In his time as a university president or chancellor, Martin has developed two rules he takes with him to work every day.

“No. 1: it’s always about what’s best for the students. No. 2: everyone on campus is important. From professors to the people who mow the lawn, they all serve the students so they’re all important,” Martin said.

“It’s very easy in these jobs to get caught up too often in your own ego because people call you ‘chancellor’ and think that’s important,” Martin said. “That’s only important if you can use whatever that is to advance the best interest of the students. It’s never about me.”

Chancellor Martin said he hopes to make each of the CSU System’s three campuses — in Fort Collins, Pueblo and online — more successful by connecting them and utilizing their individual resources.

“One of the things I think a chancellor can do is be the person who helps think through those cross-campus relationships and remove the barriers that would prevent that from occurring,” he said. “Part of that, it seems to me, is to be the cheerleader and the innovator for relationships which cause the three campuses to be more mutually supportive of one another.”

But Martin isn’t a complete newcomer to CSU. A decade ago, he was considered for the vacant president position at the university. As one of two finalists, Martin chose not to continue on in the process.

“At that time, I still hadn’t concluded that I was ready to lead a major university,”
Martin said. “My ego wanted me to do it but my rational thought process said maybe a couple more years… I didn’t see myself ready to take it on. Ten years later and a couple jobs in between later, I think I am.”

Larry Penley, the other finalist, took the job instead and resigned years later amidst a chorus of critique over his job performance.

At his previous job as chancellor of Louisiana State University, Martin faced budget reductions and had to figure out how to keep a campus prosperous despite those reductions. CSU has experienced similar budget cuts and a tuition hike in response to Colorado’s state government budget cuts.

From what Martin has observed, lawmakers are supportive of higher education and his job is to work with them as the face of CSU.

“In general, the populace and the state leadership (in Colorado) deeply regret having to make those cuts and as a consequence there is a fundamental, intrinsic value they have placed for higher education and CSU in particular,” Martin said.

“I’m not sure if that was the case in Louisiana. Many people love LSU deeply but the broader population and the state leadership, I don’t believe had quite the same commitment to higher education as Colorado does.”

Martin explained that with Colorado being in the top five states whose population has bachelor’s degrees, most of the state’s citizens believe in and have witnessed the value of higher education.

“Even during budget cut times it’s nice to know that the citizenry and representatives and the leaders of the state still value what universities do and that gives you a chance to feel as though, when the economy turns, enthusiasm for investing in higher education will endure,” Martin said.

“I think as this economy turns around, even if we don’t see a huge uptake in funding, I don’t think you’ll see continued reductions,” he said. “My sense is that there’s a stronger conviction to fix it here than there is other places and I hope that that shows.”

Martin said he would not have graduated college without state subsidies.
“During my growing up years, the state of Minnesota subsidized my education at a very high level,” Martin said. “My home state of Minnesota has always been a very strong supporter of higher education. I would not be here were it not.”

His father graduated high school and worked as a diesel mechanic in mines. His mother didn’t graduate from high school but became the mayor of their small rural town.

“It was clear to them (his parents, that) education was the only way in which the next generation was going to advance over where they started,” Martin said.

Martin is the only one of his siblings who attended a four-year college. One of his brothers is a mailman in rural Minnesota and the other manages five little radio stations.

Both of Martin’s children have gone on to pursue higher education. His daughter, Amanda, attended the University of Wisconsin and his son, Sam, went to the University of Minnesota and went on to get a second degree at Sarah Lawrence College. Currently, Sam is completing his second Master’s degree.

“I don’t think you have to have been a parent to be a university leader or a great university citizen, but in my case it helped a great deal,” Martin said.

“I literally was the dad who moved my daughter into the residence hall and didn’t want to be seen crying in the hallway,” Martin said. “…. I had to disguise my angst of my daughter leaving home.”

Martin’s son attended the University of Minnesota while he was there as dean of the institution and, as Martin admits, might have used his father’s status to his advantage.

“He, on more than one occasion, I discovered, had taken my all-access parking pass out of my car and was using it himself, so I had to threaten to have university police arrest him despite the fact that he was my son,” Martin said.

Coming to Colorado to join the CSU team is a transition, but Martin said he is ready to do all he can to continue the advancing CSU’s progress.

“I’ve always felt that Colorado State and the Colorado State system has been ahead of the national curve in several important areas and I think it can continue to do that,” Martin said.

Senior Reporter Kate Simmons can be reached at news@collegian.com.


Article 19: Construction State UniversityReviewing the 19 building projects around campusBy Kate SimmonsThe Rocky Mountain CollegianCSU students return each semester to a campus that continues to be renovated, revitalized and added on to. "CSU is always looking at ways to imporve and upgrade the educational experience for students," said Cass Beitler, project manager and assistant director, in an email to the Collegian.The Morgan Library and Parmelee Hall renovations and additions were completed over the summer. The Lory Student Center Theater and Harthshorn parking lot were two other construction projects completed before the fall term began.Work on Moby Arena continues and construction planners are aware of the challenges presented while working on a building that is still fully functioning."It was a very challenging project because we need to continue construction and continue events in the same space," said Mike Rush, university architect and building official. "Revitalization to Moby Arena is going to have a great visual impact and relieve a lot of functional challenges in the building. It was a very challenging project so there’s something to be said for getting through that." 
Work on the north concourse is expected to be completed by the volleyball team’s home opener Friday while the south side should be done by the start of the conference basketball season.
Durrell’s expansion project started August 20, 2012 and will be completed in May of 2013.
The building will have a “greatly improved dining facility with six dining venues on the second floor and improved student gathering space for study, relaxation, activities, and meetings at Durrell lower level with improved access to the building,” Beitler said.
A 600-bed housing facility will also be extended in the Durrell Center.
"The new and revitalized facilities readily accommodate student enrollment growth," Shelly Carrol said. "A number of projects revitalize existing buildings. Many of the subject buildings were originally constructed in the 1960’s." 
Rush echoed Carrol’s concerns.
"The majority of buildings on campus were developed during the 60s and many of them need attention electrically, mechanically and aesthetically," he said.
Additions to the Braiden and Parmelee residence halls were done by adding a fourth floor to an already existing building, Rush said. By adapting an existing building and improving it by adding energy efficiency to the exterior wall brings the 40 to 60 year old dormitories up to date. It is also beneficial to add onto already existing structures so new projects do not take up any of the existing open space on campus.
"We see a dramatic improvement to the campus aesthetic through continuity of form and material qualities. The projects also greatly improve the energy efficiency and functionality in these existing structurally sound buildings," Carrol said. "After revitalization these facilities will continue to sustainably serve the university for many years to come."
One of the projects designed to improve the campus aesthetic is the Academic Village North project. It will completely transform the north side of campus along Laurel St. Landscaping improvements will be added at the Towers, Durrell, Corbett, and Rockwell residence halls.
"In the Academic Village North project we are deconstructing a 1940’s building to greatly increase development density. This project accommodates a living learning community on the north side of campus," Carrol said. "This deconstruction and redevelopment allows us to not only continue to preserve the existing open and green spaces, but also create new ones."
University Facilities Fees and University Reserves pay for these construction projects.
"Bear with us," Rush said about the continuing construction on campus. "If you look at the projects we’ve completed like the Behavioral Sciences Building, it was really embraced by the campus community and it adds to the aesthetic of campus. We try to accommodate construction and make it as painless as possible but there is always obvious inconvenience."

Article 19: Construction State University
Reviewing the 19 building projects around campus

By Kate Simmons
The Rocky Mountain Collegian

CSU students return each semester to a campus that continues to be renovated, revitalized and added on to. 

"CSU is always looking at ways to imporve and upgrade the educational experience for students," said Cass Beitler, project manager and assistant director, in an email to the Collegian.

The Morgan Library and Parmelee Hall renovations and additions were completed over the summer. The Lory Student Center Theater and Harthshorn parking lot were two other construction projects completed before the fall term began.

Work on Moby Arena continues and construction planners are aware of the challenges presented while working on a building that is still fully functioning.

"It was a very challenging project because we need to continue construction and continue events in the same space," said Mike Rush, university architect and building official. "Revitalization to Moby Arena is going to have a great visual impact and relieve a lot of functional challenges in the building. It was a very challenging project so there’s something to be said for getting through that." 

Work on the north concourse is expected to be completed by the volleyball team’s home opener Friday while the south side should be done by the start of the conference basketball season.

Durrell’s expansion project started August 20, 2012 and will be completed in May of 2013.

The building will have a “greatly improved dining facility with six dining venues on the second floor and improved student gathering space for study, relaxation, activities, and meetings at Durrell lower level with improved access to the building,” Beitler said.

A 600-bed housing facility will also be extended in the Durrell Center.

"The new and revitalized facilities readily accommodate student enrollment growth," Shelly Carrol said. "A number of projects revitalize existing buildings. Many of the subject buildings were originally constructed in the 1960’s." 

Rush echoed Carrol’s concerns.

"The majority of buildings on campus were developed during the 60s and many of them need attention electrically, mechanically and aesthetically," he said.

Additions to the Braiden and Parmelee residence halls were done by adding a fourth floor to an already existing building, Rush said. By adapting an existing building and improving it by adding energy efficiency to the exterior wall brings the 40 to 60 year old dormitories up to date. It is also beneficial to add onto already existing structures so new projects do not take up any of the existing open space on campus.

"We see a dramatic improvement to the campus aesthetic through continuity of form and material qualities. The projects also greatly improve the energy efficiency and functionality in these existing structurally sound buildings," Carrol said. "After revitalization these facilities will continue to sustainably serve the university for many years to come."

One of the projects designed to improve the campus aesthetic is the Academic Village North project. It will completely transform the north side of campus along Laurel St. Landscaping improvements will be added at the Towers, Durrell, Corbett, and Rockwell residence halls.

"In the Academic Village North project we are deconstructing a 1940’s building to greatly increase development density. This project accommodates a living learning community on the north side of campus," Carrol said. "This deconstruction and redevelopment allows us to not only continue to preserve the existing open and green spaces, but also create new ones."

University Facilities Fees and University Reserves pay for these construction projects.

"Bear with us," Rush said about the continuing construction on campus. "If you look at the projects we’ve completed like the Behavioral Sciences Building, it was really embraced by the campus community and it adds to the aesthetic of campus. We try to accommodate construction and make it as painless as possible but there is always obvious inconvenience."

Article 18: Get to know the Ram Welcome leaders showing around CSU’s newest freshmenFor Ram Welcome leader Zach Zeilik, helping to get new CSU freshmen acquainted with the university is an opportunity to pass his love for the Rams to another generation.
Training for Ram Welcome leaders started Aug. 5 where they learned the skills needed to welcome the freshmen class and present a positive and informed introduction to Colorado State.
Each leader is assigned a floor in each residence hall on campus. Most of them start their day at 7:15 a.m. when they wake up the freshmen for which they’re responsible. Some leaders don’t stop working until 1 a.m.
“We’re like a lifeline for them (incoming freshmen) so any minute they’re awake we try to be around to answer questions for them,” said Rebecca Burney, an undeclared sophomore.
The Ram Welcome leaders are trained to answer questions freshmen have and are also trained to be good facilitators. Burney and her fellow Ram Welcome leaders trained for two full days, learning icebreakers, how to facilitate small groups, mitigate conflict and get to know each other.
“When we’re all in a circle and they (freshmen) are all talking together we kind of step back even if it’s not on task because the point is for them to get to know each other,” said Ashlee Shelly, a senior animal science major.
While a part of their job involves facilitating interaction, most of them love being ram welcome leaders because they enjoy getting to know the freshmen.
“It’s great getting to know the incoming class and being the first fresh face they see on campus,” said Meghan Migas, a junior criminal justice major. Migas wanted to become a ram welcome leader because she remembers how fun and rewarding Ram Welcome was when she was a freshman.
Shelly hopes the freshmen feel as though their leaders are approachable because they’re fellow students and remember what it’s like to be in their shoes. “The program is for students by students,” she said.
The Ram Welcome leaders are passionate about helping facilitate freshmen’s transition to college and welcoming them to CSU.
“As students ourselves we can answer questions and pass on our experience,” said Claire Hamlin, a junior English major. “How can we as Ram Welcome leaders pass on our experience? Tell them what worked and what didn’t. Help get them prepared for what to do –– peer to peer. We’re just students who want to help.”
For many freshmen, their leaders are the first exposure they have to CSU.
“Being a Ram Welcome leader is the best experience I’ve had at CSU,” said Katy Watt, a senior human development and family studies major. Watt, who is in her second year as a ram welcome leader, has enjoyed, “making people feel connected to such a great university.” 

Article 18: Get to know the Ram Welcome leaders showing around CSU’s newest freshmen

For Ram Welcome leader Zach Zeilik, helping to get new CSU freshmen acquainted with the university is an opportunity to pass his love for the Rams to another generation.

Training for Ram Welcome leaders started Aug. 5 where they learned the skills needed to welcome the freshmen class and present a positive and informed introduction to Colorado State.

Each leader is assigned a floor in each residence hall on campus. Most of them start their day at 7:15 a.m. when they wake up the freshmen for which they’re responsible. Some leaders don’t stop working until 1 a.m.

“We’re like a lifeline for them (incoming freshmen) so any minute they’re awake we try to be around to answer questions for them,” said Rebecca Burney, an undeclared sophomore.

The Ram Welcome leaders are trained to answer questions freshmen have and are also trained to be good facilitators. Burney and her fellow Ram Welcome leaders trained for two full days, learning icebreakers, how to facilitate small groups, mitigate conflict and get to know each other.

“When we’re all in a circle and they (freshmen) are all talking together we kind of step back even if it’s not on task because the point is for them to get to know each other,” said Ashlee Shelly, a senior animal science major.

While a part of their job involves facilitating interaction, most of them love being ram welcome leaders because they enjoy getting to know the freshmen.

“It’s great getting to know the incoming class and being the first fresh face they see on campus,” said Meghan Migas, a junior criminal justice major. Migas wanted to become a ram welcome leader because she remembers how fun and rewarding Ram Welcome was when she was a freshman.

Shelly hopes the freshmen feel as though their leaders are approachable because they’re fellow students and remember what it’s like to be in their shoes. “The program is for students by students,” she said.

The Ram Welcome leaders are passionate about helping facilitate freshmen’s transition to college and welcoming them to CSU.

“As students ourselves we can answer questions and pass on our experience,” said Claire Hamlin, a junior English major. “How can we as Ram Welcome leaders pass on our experience? Tell them what worked and what didn’t. Help get them prepared for what to do –– peer to peer. We’re just students who want to help.”

For many freshmen, their leaders are the first exposure they have to CSU.

“Being a Ram Welcome leader is the best experience I’ve had at CSU,” said Katy Watt, a senior human development and family studies major. Watt, who is in her second year as a ram welcome leader, has enjoyed, “making people feel connected to such a great university.” 

Article 17: In-State tuition hike approved at BOG meeting

Article 17: In-State tuition hike approved at BOG meeting